#flavorsofindiawithmegha photos & videos

1 weeks ago

#flavorsofindiawithmegha One of my most favorite dishes and the biggest bestseller from my menu - The Railway mutton curry. 🚂🚂 Railway Mutton curry is a toned down version of the classic Bengali mutton curry (Mangshor Jhol ), with coconut milk diluting the spices and served with rice, bread or dinner rolls. Vinegar was added to the mix of mutton and potatoes to increase the durability of the meat during long journeys. The curry was not too spicy keeping in mind the delicate palates of the British. Though the dish originated in the colonial times it continued to be served in railway refreshment rooms and on long distance trains till much later. As the renowned Bengali food expert Ms.Pritha Sen explains - "The railway cuisine was generously tempered with a South Indian flavour. The reason being that much of the Class IV railway staff were South Indians, mainly Telugus from Andhra Pradesh. The engine drivers and ticket collectors or station masters were Anglo-Indians, the last of the community left in Railway service before they all emigrated to Australia. So the dishes that were served in the railways were a blend of Anglo-Indian, Bengali and South Indian. " We served the Railway Mutton curry with turmeric potatoes, lavash bread and laccha onions with gondhoraj. . . Photo credits : @poemsonmypalms @weekendartist_ . . . #winters #foodporn #foodtalkindia #foodgasm #feedfeed #foodgram #foodstagram #yummy #nomnom #indiancuisine #chefswag #chefsroll #womenchefs #ladychefs #instafood #instachef #instapic #huffpost #huffpostgram #chefsofinstagram #truecooks #rustic #gastronomy #foodlovers #picoftheday #foodpics #buzzfeast

57636
2 weeks ago

#flavorsofindiawithmegha Got myself some Afghani breads today! Delhi has a big Afghani community who settled in the city after fleeing the turmoil from their country. Fleeing the war, they have tried to recreate their life from back home, including through food. They brought their culture & introduced their technique of bread making to this city. Since the late 1990s, naanwais (Afghani bread makers ) have been baking and selling a variety of traditional Afghan breads such as naan Afghani, roghani and lavasa in Delhi, adding yet another dimension to thia city’s diverse culinary landscape. In fact a colony in Lajpat Nagar is also known as "Little Kabul". When the migration from Afghanistan to India started, many of the immigrants made Delhi their base, especially areas such as Bhogal and Lajpat Nagar. You will witness signboards in the street of shops in both languages, English and Dari which are the two prominent and official languages of Afghanistan. In a typical Afghan household, bread is eaten daily but is hardly made at home; it is instead bought from the naanwais in the lanes. The naanwais, make fresh bread through the day. People don't make bread at home as all their bread is made in the tandoor. All the bread is made and flattened by hand. You will not be able to spot any rolling pin in any of these shops. A wooden stamp or a hair comb is used to mark a pattern on the surface of the bread. This is done to aid the baking process, as the breads are quite thick, as well as for decorative purposes. Some of the most commonly sold naans are naan afghani, naan uzbeki (in the picture ) and plain naan. You can try out Afghani food in Delhi at the Afghan market in Lajpat Nagar, Kashmir lane in Bhogal, Malviya Nagar and Tilak Nagar. . . . . . . . . . . . #food #foodblogfeed #myfab5 #afghanistanfood #dfordelhi #tastingtable #f52grams #iphonesia #dailyfoodfeed #buzzfeast #iphoneonly #delhites #cheatmeal #huffposttaste #newdelhi #heresmyfood #flatlay #nothingisordinary #feedfeed #eatingfortheinsta #delhigram #iphoneography #iphoneography #lovefood #feedyoursoull #afghanistan #eater #spoonfeed #eattheworld

63519
5 weeks ago

𝗝𝗮𝗸𝗵𝗶𝘆𝗮 𝘀𝗲𝗲𝗱𝘀 #flavorsofindiawithmegha A tiny, dark brown seed with a beautiful earthy aroma and a unique flavour, jakhiya is the seed from the Himalayas. 🏔🌲 It's also known as wild mustard or dog mustard. The seeds, which are dried in the sun before they are sold, are used for tempering almost all types of vegetables and curries in Uttarakhand. Because of its sharp pungent smell and crunchy taste,the people of Uttarakhand prefer jakhiya for tempering. It is used in the tempering of, vegetables, curries, pulses, anything and everything. Jakhiya is used most in Uttarakhand cuisine than any other cuisine. It is one of those pungent herbs that give Uttarakhandi food the taste of the mountains.🌲 Leaves of jakhiya are also eaten as substitute for green vegetables in villages. People collect the seeds and gift them to their kin living in areas where jakhiya does not grow. As the unique tang and essence of jakhiya has gained popularity, the demand for its seeds has increased in the region and farmers have started paying more attention to the crop being sold commercially. Growing jakhiya does not involve too many financial inputs. The rainfed crop can even grow in extremely poor soils as a weed. The oil extracted from jakhiya seeds has medicinal properties. Fresh oil of crushed seeds is used for treating infantile convulsions mental disorders. It is helpful in malarial fevers, fevers due to indigestion, skin diseases, leprosy, blood diseases, and uterine complaints. My menu had jakhiya aloo, kafuli (greens cooked in a Uttarakhand recipe ), amla pickle with a tempering of jakhiya. 👩‍🍳👩‍🍳 Isn't it so beautiful to see the amount of #biodiversity that our country is blessed with and how we have such a wide array of ingridients and flavors just within one country? 🌿🌱🌎👩‍🍳 . . . . #plantbased #plantforward #chefsofinstagram #cooking #chefslife #chefsroll #chefswag #goodfood4all #instapic #foodie #foodporn #sustainable #eatlocal #eatseasonal #future50foods #biodiversity2020 #sdg2 #womeninculinary #yum #goyaeats #tasty #picoftheday #food #healthy #huffposttaste #foodislife #foodcanfixit #actnow

3289
last month

𝐆𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐣 #flavorsofindiawithmegha The essence of so many of my dishes and one of my most favorite ingredients - the Gondhoraj lebu or lime. 🍋This bright green oblong lime, also known as the Rangpur lime, originates in Sylhet and the hills of Chittagong, Bangladesh - is a cross between a lime and a mandarin orange. It adds such a characteristic taste and aroma to any dish you add it to. Gondhoraj literally translates to "Aroma King", and there couldn't have been a more apt name for this lime. Cut into long quarters with the thick green rind intact, it has to be gently pressed to extract but a few drops of actual juice and plentiful bits of aromatic pulp. That tiny quantity is enough to elevate the flavor of any dish. Try it with fish, prawns, grills or have it in your drink, especially gin and you will be addicted! What’s even more interesting is that all parts of the Gondhoraj can be used in any dish. It's leaves can be used to elevate the flavor of curries or can also be used in a shukti , to using its zest in fresh or dried form on kosha mangsho or bhetki paturi or cakes and other desserts. I used to serve the Gondhoraj complimentary with almost all of my dishes, whether it was with buttered Gobindobhog rice, grills, kebabs, or curries. I have loved talking to so many guests explaining to them what the Gondhoraj is and how just a few drops will elevate their dish and post our conversation I would give them whole Gondhoraj lebus to take home 😍. I feel extremely proud that we were one of the first few restaurants to promote this beautiful lebu in our dishes👩‍🍳 In fact over the last few years, I have seen many restaurants incorporate this beautiful lemon into their food menu & drinks menu and it feels so good to see our local lebu get the importance that it deserves ❤️ . Photo credits : @poemsonmypalms @weekendartist_ . instapic #instachef #instagood #instafood #beautifulcuisines #localproduce #eatlocal #chefsofinstagram #ginto #dailyfoodfeed #foodporn #foodtalkindia #feedfeed #huffpost #huffpostgram #buzzfeedfood #indiancuisine #picoftheday #truecooks #chefstalk #yummy

4447
last month

𝐒𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐮 #flavorsofindiawithmegha The most popular chickpea byproduct in Bihar, is Sattu which is also known as the poor man's protein, and the most indigenous protein of India. The word “sattu” is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘saktu’ which meant the coarse flour obtained by grinding parched barley or parched rice. Sattu now refers to the coarse flour of any parched grain, including pulses. In Bihar , sattu refers to channa (chickpea ) flour . To make sattu , chickpeas are soaked in water, sun dried , roasted in a iron pan filled with hot sand and ground in a stone mill to a fine flour. What was looked upon as a poor mans food is now known as a global superfood. It is one of the earliest meals of primitive humans. Usually served in Bihar & Jharkhand as a drink in summers (known as sattu cooler, and as shown in the picture ) as it has a immediate cooling effect on the body. And when made into balls(litti ), to be eaten with curry, it becomes a powerhouse of energy. Traditionally sattu was (and still is ) a daily meal for field workers who carry it to the fields and knead it with water and chilli to make a dough which they eat as it gives them the energy for the hard work and labour that they have to put in through the day. Sattu is also the main ingredient in the most famous and iconic dish that represents Bihari food - the litti. In the first picture is the Sattu cooler and the second picture is the litti, both from my Bihari thaali menu of 2019. Detailed post on litti will be up soon! 👩‍🍳 . . . 📸 for litti @poemsonmypalms @weekendartist_ . . . . . #indianphotography #india #photography #photographers #ig #nature #portrait #instagood #indiapictures #photooftheday #indiaclicks #travel #picoftheday #soi #delhi #instagram #indian #incredibleindia #storiesofindia #streetphotography #foodphotography #photographer #mypixeldiary #naturephotography #foodporn #photo #streetphotographyindia

38012
last month

#Repost @meghakohli • • • • • • Jama Masjid, Delhi 𝐊𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐫𝐢 𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐢. #flavorsofindiawithmegha This is my most favorite bread in the world! The Indian version of sour dough bread. "Khamir" is an Urdu word meaning yeast and khamiri roti was a staple bread during the Mughal Era. It's made in a tandoor and is the perfect accompaniment to the delicious Mughlai curries as it soaks up all the flavors. Earlier, in summers, people used to ferment the atta by leaving it overnight to let the dough rise and prepare these rotis. Earlier the Indian bread industry was run by Naan Bais and Bhatiyaras, who used to supply locals a range of traditional breads. Naan Bais used to supply bulk orders during festivals and other family events/celebrations whereas Bhatiyaras (the term originates from the bhattis or kilns that they used ) supplied breads to households on a daily basis. The culture of purchasing breads from outside is Central Asian and came to India with the Mughals. The mastery of the same can be seen in various shops in Old Delhi till date who claim to be direct descendants of the cooks who worked for the Mughal Empire and use the same recipes that their ancestors used. They are soft, spongy, thick, chewy and slightly tangy in taste. I love to eat Khamiri rotis from Old Delhi and Nizamuddin along with a korma or nihari 😍 . . #streetphotographyindia #bread #herstoshare #hersoninsta #hertrivandrum #hertrivandrumgoingplaces #hertrivandrumoninsta #herthoughts #hershares #womenpower #womengoingforward #womenhelpingwomen #showingtheworldhertalent #whatawomancando #womentalentplatform #womenrulingsocialmedia #herideas #herbestfootforward #herstrengths #womenwhowork #hersonly #herideastotheworld #herhobbies #herdisplayofstrength #woman #girlpower #streetfood

291
last month

𝐊𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐫𝐢 𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐢. #flavorsofindiawithmegha This is my most favorite bread in the world! The Indian version of sour dough bread. "Khamir" is an Urdu word meaning yeast and khamiri roti was a staple bread during the Mughal Era. It's made in a tandoor and is the perfect accompaniment to the delicious Mughlai curries as it soaks up all the flavors. Earlier, in summers, people used to ferment the atta by leaving it overnight to let the dough rise and prepare these rotis. Earlier the Indian bread industry was run by Naan Bais and Bhatiyaras, who used to supply locals a range of traditional breads. Naan Bais used to supply bulk orders during festivals and other family events/celebrations whereas Bhatiyaras (the term originates from the bhattis or kilns that they used ) supplied breads to households on a daily basis. The culture of purchasing breads from outside is Central Asian and came to India with the Mughals. The mastery of the same can be seen in various shops in Old Delhi till date who claim to be direct descendants of the cooks who worked for the Mughal Empire and use the same recipes that their ancestors used. They are soft, spongy, thick, chewy and slightly tangy in taste. I love to eat Khamiri rotis from Old Delhi and Nizamuddin along with a korma or nihari 😍 . . #indianphotography #india #photography #photographers #ig #nature #portrait #instagood #indiapictures #photooftheday #indiaclicks #travel #picoftheday #soi #delhi #instagram #indian #incredibleindia #storiesofindia #streetphotography #foodphotography #photographer #mypixeldiary #naturephotography #foodporn #photo #shotoniphonex #streetphotographyindia #bread

74230

Top photos & videos on #flavorsofindiawithmegha

2 weeks ago

#flavorsofindiawithmegha Got myself some Afghani breads today! Delhi has a big Afghani community who settled in the city after fleeing the turmoil from their country. Fleeing the war, they have tried to recreate their life from back home, including through food. They brought their culture & introduced their technique of bread making to this city. Since the late 1990s, naanwais (Afghani bread makers ) have been baking and selling a variety of traditional Afghan breads such as naan Afghani, roghani and lavasa in Delhi, adding yet another dimension to thia city’s diverse culinary landscape. In fact a colony in Lajpat Nagar is also known as "Little Kabul". When the migration from Afghanistan to India started, many of the immigrants made Delhi their base, especially areas such as Bhogal and Lajpat Nagar. You will witness signboards in the street of shops in both languages, English and Dari which are the two prominent and official languages of Afghanistan. In a typical Afghan household, bread is eaten daily but is hardly made at home; it is instead bought from the naanwais in the lanes. The naanwais, make fresh bread through the day. People don't make bread at home as all their bread is made in the tandoor. All the bread is made and flattened by hand. You will not be able to spot any rolling pin in any of these shops. A wooden stamp or a hair comb is used to mark a pattern on the surface of the bread. This is done to aid the baking process, as the breads are quite thick, as well as for decorative purposes. Some of the most commonly sold naans are naan afghani, naan uzbeki (in the picture ) and plain naan. You can try out Afghani food in Delhi at the Afghan market in Lajpat Nagar, Kashmir lane in Bhogal, Malviya Nagar and Tilak Nagar. . . . . . . . . . . . #food #foodblogfeed #myfab5 #afghanistanfood #dfordelhi #tastingtable #f52grams #iphonesia #dailyfoodfeed #buzzfeast #iphoneonly #delhites #cheatmeal #huffposttaste #newdelhi #heresmyfood #flatlay #nothingisordinary #feedfeed #eatingfortheinsta #delhigram #iphoneography #iphoneography #lovefood #feedyoursoull #afghanistan #eater #spoonfeed #eattheworld

63519
1 weeks ago

#flavorsofindiawithmegha One of my most favorite dishes and the biggest bestseller from my menu - The Railway mutton curry. 🚂🚂 Railway Mutton curry is a toned down version of the classic Bengali mutton curry (Mangshor Jhol ), with coconut milk diluting the spices and served with rice, bread or dinner rolls. Vinegar was added to the mix of mutton and potatoes to increase the durability of the meat during long journeys. The curry was not too spicy keeping in mind the delicate palates of the British. Though the dish originated in the colonial times it continued to be served in railway refreshment rooms and on long distance trains till much later. As the renowned Bengali food expert Ms.Pritha Sen explains - "The railway cuisine was generously tempered with a South Indian flavour. The reason being that much of the Class IV railway staff were South Indians, mainly Telugus from Andhra Pradesh. The engine drivers and ticket collectors or station masters were Anglo-Indians, the last of the community left in Railway service before they all emigrated to Australia. So the dishes that were served in the railways were a blend of Anglo-Indian, Bengali and South Indian. " We served the Railway Mutton curry with turmeric potatoes, lavash bread and laccha onions with gondhoraj. . . Photo credits : @poemsonmypalms @weekendartist_ . . . #winters #foodporn #foodtalkindia #foodgasm #feedfeed #foodgram #foodstagram #yummy #nomnom #indiancuisine #chefswag #chefsroll #womenchefs #ladychefs #instafood #instachef #instapic #huffpost #huffpostgram #chefsofinstagram #truecooks #rustic #gastronomy #foodlovers #picoftheday #foodpics #buzzfeast

57636
last month

𝐊𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐫𝐢 𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐢. #flavorsofindiawithmegha This is my most favorite bread in the world! The Indian version of sour dough bread. "Khamir" is an Urdu word meaning yeast and khamiri roti was a staple bread during the Mughal Era. It's made in a tandoor and is the perfect accompaniment to the delicious Mughlai curries as it soaks up all the flavors. Earlier, in summers, people used to ferment the atta by leaving it overnight to let the dough rise and prepare these rotis. Earlier the Indian bread industry was run by Naan Bais and Bhatiyaras, who used to supply locals a range of traditional breads. Naan Bais used to supply bulk orders during festivals and other family events/celebrations whereas Bhatiyaras (the term originates from the bhattis or kilns that they used ) supplied breads to households on a daily basis. The culture of purchasing breads from outside is Central Asian and came to India with the Mughals. The mastery of the same can be seen in various shops in Old Delhi till date who claim to be direct descendants of the cooks who worked for the Mughal Empire and use the same recipes that their ancestors used. They are soft, spongy, thick, chewy and slightly tangy in taste. I love to eat Khamiri rotis from Old Delhi and Nizamuddin along with a korma or nihari 😍 . . #indianphotography #india #photography #photographers #ig #nature #portrait #instagood #indiapictures #photooftheday #indiaclicks #travel #picoftheday #soi #delhi #instagram #indian #incredibleindia #storiesofindia #streetphotography #foodphotography #photographer #mypixeldiary #naturephotography #foodporn #photo #shotoniphonex #streetphotographyindia #bread

74230
last month

𝐒𝐚𝐭𝐭𝐮 #flavorsofindiawithmegha The most popular chickpea byproduct in Bihar, is Sattu which is also known as the poor man's protein, and the most indigenous protein of India. The word “sattu” is derived from the Sanskrit word ‘saktu’ which meant the coarse flour obtained by grinding parched barley or parched rice. Sattu now refers to the coarse flour of any parched grain, including pulses. In Bihar , sattu refers to channa (chickpea ) flour . To make sattu , chickpeas are soaked in water, sun dried , roasted in a iron pan filled with hot sand and ground in a stone mill to a fine flour. What was looked upon as a poor mans food is now known as a global superfood. It is one of the earliest meals of primitive humans. Usually served in Bihar & Jharkhand as a drink in summers (known as sattu cooler, and as shown in the picture ) as it has a immediate cooling effect on the body. And when made into balls(litti ), to be eaten with curry, it becomes a powerhouse of energy. Traditionally sattu was (and still is ) a daily meal for field workers who carry it to the fields and knead it with water and chilli to make a dough which they eat as it gives them the energy for the hard work and labour that they have to put in through the day. Sattu is also the main ingredient in the most famous and iconic dish that represents Bihari food - the litti. In the first picture is the Sattu cooler and the second picture is the litti, both from my Bihari thaali menu of 2019. Detailed post on litti will be up soon! 👩‍🍳 . . . 📸 for litti @poemsonmypalms @weekendartist_ . . . . . #indianphotography #india #photography #photographers #ig #nature #portrait #instagood #indiapictures #photooftheday #indiaclicks #travel #picoftheday #soi #delhi #instagram #indian #incredibleindia #storiesofindia #streetphotography #foodphotography #photographer #mypixeldiary #naturephotography #foodporn #photo #streetphotographyindia

38012
last month

𝐆𝐨𝐧𝐝𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐚𝐣 #flavorsofindiawithmegha The essence of so many of my dishes and one of my most favorite ingredients - the Gondhoraj lebu or lime. 🍋This bright green oblong lime, also known as the Rangpur lime, originates in Sylhet and the hills of Chittagong, Bangladesh - is a cross between a lime and a mandarin orange. It adds such a characteristic taste and aroma to any dish you add it to. Gondhoraj literally translates to "Aroma King", and there couldn't have been a more apt name for this lime. Cut into long quarters with the thick green rind intact, it has to be gently pressed to extract but a few drops of actual juice and plentiful bits of aromatic pulp. That tiny quantity is enough to elevate the flavor of any dish. Try it with fish, prawns, grills or have it in your drink, especially gin and you will be addicted! What’s even more interesting is that all parts of the Gondhoraj can be used in any dish. It's leaves can be used to elevate the flavor of curries or can also be used in a shukti , to using its zest in fresh or dried form on kosha mangsho or bhetki paturi or cakes and other desserts. I used to serve the Gondhoraj complimentary with almost all of my dishes, whether it was with buttered Gobindobhog rice, grills, kebabs, or curries. I have loved talking to so many guests explaining to them what the Gondhoraj is and how just a few drops will elevate their dish and post our conversation I would give them whole Gondhoraj lebus to take home 😍. I feel extremely proud that we were one of the first few restaurants to promote this beautiful lebu in our dishes👩‍🍳 In fact over the last few years, I have seen many restaurants incorporate this beautiful lemon into their food menu & drinks menu and it feels so good to see our local lebu get the importance that it deserves ❤️ . Photo credits : @poemsonmypalms @weekendartist_ . instapic #instachef #instagood #instafood #beautifulcuisines #localproduce #eatlocal #chefsofinstagram #ginto #dailyfoodfeed #foodporn #foodtalkindia #feedfeed #huffpost #huffpostgram #buzzfeedfood #indiancuisine #picoftheday #truecooks #chefstalk #yummy

4447
5 weeks ago

𝗝𝗮𝗸𝗵𝗶𝘆𝗮 𝘀𝗲𝗲𝗱𝘀 #flavorsofindiawithmegha A tiny, dark brown seed with a beautiful earthy aroma and a unique flavour, jakhiya is the seed from the Himalayas. 🏔🌲 It's also known as wild mustard or dog mustard. The seeds, which are dried in the sun before they are sold, are used for tempering almost all types of vegetables and curries in Uttarakhand. Because of its sharp pungent smell and crunchy taste,the people of Uttarakhand prefer jakhiya for tempering. It is used in the tempering of, vegetables, curries, pulses, anything and everything. Jakhiya is used most in Uttarakhand cuisine than any other cuisine. It is one of those pungent herbs that give Uttarakhandi food the taste of the mountains.🌲 Leaves of jakhiya are also eaten as substitute for green vegetables in villages. People collect the seeds and gift them to their kin living in areas where jakhiya does not grow. As the unique tang and essence of jakhiya has gained popularity, the demand for its seeds has increased in the region and farmers have started paying more attention to the crop being sold commercially. Growing jakhiya does not involve too many financial inputs. The rainfed crop can even grow in extremely poor soils as a weed. The oil extracted from jakhiya seeds has medicinal properties. Fresh oil of crushed seeds is used for treating infantile convulsions mental disorders. It is helpful in malarial fevers, fevers due to indigestion, skin diseases, leprosy, blood diseases, and uterine complaints. My menu had jakhiya aloo, kafuli (greens cooked in a Uttarakhand recipe ), amla pickle with a tempering of jakhiya. 👩‍🍳👩‍🍳 Isn't it so beautiful to see the amount of #biodiversity that our country is blessed with and how we have such a wide array of ingridients and flavors just within one country? 🌿🌱🌎👩‍🍳 . . . . #plantbased #plantforward #chefsofinstagram #cooking #chefslife #chefsroll #chefswag #goodfood4all #instapic #foodie #foodporn #sustainable #eatlocal #eatseasonal #future50foods #biodiversity2020 #sdg2 #womeninculinary #yum #goyaeats #tasty #picoftheday #food #healthy #huffposttaste #foodislife #foodcanfixit #actnow

3289
last month

#Repost @meghakohli • • • • • • Jama Masjid, Delhi 𝐊𝐡𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐫𝐢 𝐫𝐨𝐭𝐢. #flavorsofindiawithmegha This is my most favorite bread in the world! The Indian version of sour dough bread. "Khamir" is an Urdu word meaning yeast and khamiri roti was a staple bread during the Mughal Era. It's made in a tandoor and is the perfect accompaniment to the delicious Mughlai curries as it soaks up all the flavors. Earlier, in summers, people used to ferment the atta by leaving it overnight to let the dough rise and prepare these rotis. Earlier the Indian bread industry was run by Naan Bais and Bhatiyaras, who used to supply locals a range of traditional breads. Naan Bais used to supply bulk orders during festivals and other family events/celebrations whereas Bhatiyaras (the term originates from the bhattis or kilns that they used ) supplied breads to households on a daily basis. The culture of purchasing breads from outside is Central Asian and came to India with the Mughals. The mastery of the same can be seen in various shops in Old Delhi till date who claim to be direct descendants of the cooks who worked for the Mughal Empire and use the same recipes that their ancestors used. They are soft, spongy, thick, chewy and slightly tangy in taste. I love to eat Khamiri rotis from Old Delhi and Nizamuddin along with a korma or nihari 😍 . . #streetphotographyindia #bread #herstoshare #hersoninsta #hertrivandrum #hertrivandrumgoingplaces #hertrivandrumoninsta #herthoughts #hershares #womenpower #womengoingforward #womenhelpingwomen #showingtheworldhertalent #whatawomancando #womentalentplatform #womenrulingsocialmedia #herideas #herbestfootforward #herstrengths #womenwhowork #hersonly #herideastotheworld #herhobbies #herdisplayofstrength #woman #girlpower #streetfood

291